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Thread: OUA, AUS cancelled

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    Default OUA, AUS cancelled

    At 1pm the OUA and AUS cancelled all fall sports.
    Founded in 1848, the University of Ottawa adopted its official colours Garnet and Grey, and like many nineteenth-century institutions, the athletics teams were known only by the school's colours. Eventually, a connection was made between the shorthand "GGs" and "Gee-Gee", the common British nickname for a racehorse. The unique Gee-Gees name and iconic logo known today is a result of 170 years of history in Ottawa

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    South of the border.....but the Ivy League becomes the first conference to join the party cancelling all Fall Sports.
    2019: 10 weeks, 17 games, 6,587kms.
    2018: 11 weeks, 17 games, 7,952kms. (preseason incl.)
    2017: 12 weeks, 21 games, 9,675kms. (preseason incl.)
    2016: 14 weeks, 18 games, 9,791kms. (preseason incl.)
    2015: 11 weeks, 16 games, 6,247kms.
    .......
    2009: 12 weeks, 19 games, 11,063kms.
    2008: 12 weeks, 19 games, 6,191kms.
    2007: 11 weeks, 18 games and 7,531kms.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chappy View Post
    South of the border.....but the Ivy League becomes the first conference to join the party cancelling all Fall Sports.
    Well that sure makes the Harvard point moot.
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    Probably deserves a separate thread, but the decision to not let 25 year old players get a final season next year is bound to be unpopular.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gilligan View Post
    Probably deserves a separate thread, but the decision to not let 25 year old players get a final season next year is bound to be unpopular.
    Ivy League is kinda different, tho. Athletics are not anywhere near the top priority.
    Laval Rouge et Or

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    SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES - NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS

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    Quote Originally Posted by marton View Post
    Ivy League is kinda different, tho. Athletics are not anywhere near the top priority.
    I'm talking about USports. Apparently they've decided that those who age out of football this year do not get to play next year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gilligan View Post
    I'm talking about USports. Apparently they've decided that those who age out of football this year do not get to play next year.
    Yikes, that's quite a sad way to bid farewell to football.
    Rouge et Or all the way!

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    Quote Originally Posted by gilligan View Post
    I'm talking about USports. Apparently they've decided that those who age out of football this year do not get to play next year.
    If any of them were getting an AFA, I wonder if the schools will pay them this year seeing as their university football time is now over. I must check my alama maters eligibility certificate ans see if any Gee-Gees are affected by this.
    Founded in 1848, the University of Ottawa adopted its official colours Garnet and Grey, and like many nineteenth-century institutions, the athletics teams were known only by the school's colours. Eventually, a connection was made between the shorthand "GGs" and "Gee-Gee", the common British nickname for a racehorse. The unique Gee-Gees name and iconic logo known today is a result of 170 years of history in Ottawa

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    Quote Originally Posted by gilligan View Post
    I'm talking about USports. Apparently they've decided that those who age out of football this year do not get to play next year.
    Ah. Right. Harsh but not quite surprising. Would have been better if they had followed the same path the NCAA did. Then again, there is no age clock in the NCAA.
    Laval Rouge et Or

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    SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES - NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS

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    ^^^^--and IF the RSEQ still has a season this fall, I am still trying to find out if uOttawa's RSEQ teams have committed to play this year.

    Practices can be held in Quebec now. Full,practices can not be held in Ontario as of yet. However, when the time comes for full team practices our RSEQ teams could possibly do so on a field in Gatineau if necessary,---a few minutes away.

    Perhaps the men's football team could too.

    Edit: I was just informed that Gee-Gee coaches of RSEQ teams are preparing as best they can under the assumption that there will be a season. I guess that means that they are in.

    Gee-Gee teams in the RSEQ:

    Womens rugby
    Mens rugby
    Womens swimming
    Mens swimming
    Womens volleyball
    Womens hockey
    Womens indoor soccer (winter)
    Last edited by ottawafan; 2020-07-09 at 13:28.
    Founded in 1848, the University of Ottawa adopted its official colours Garnet and Grey, and like many nineteenth-century institutions, the athletics teams were known only by the school's colours. Eventually, a connection was made between the shorthand "GGs" and "Gee-Gee", the common British nickname for a racehorse. The unique Gee-Gees name and iconic logo known today is a result of 170 years of history in Ottawa

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    Quote Originally Posted by ottawafan View Post
    ^^^^--and IF the RSEQ still has a season this fall, I am still trying to find out if uOttawa's RSEQ teams have committed to play this year.

    Practices can be held in Quebec now. Full,practices can not be held in Ontario as of yet. However, when the time comes for full team practices our RSEQ teams could possibly do so on a field in Gatineau if necessary,---a few minutes away.

    Perhaps the men's football team could too.

    Edit: I was just informed that Gee-Gee coaches of RSEQ teams are preparing as best they can under the assumption that there will be a season. I guess that means that they are in.

    Gee-Gee teams in the RSEQ:

    Womens rugby
    Mens rugby
    Womens swimming
    Mens swimming
    Womens volleyball
    Womens hockey
    Womens indoor soccer (winter)
    That's interesting. Isn't that basically an admission by UOttawa that they are letting someone else decide whether to run their fall sports teams? How can they justify that, other than a big shrug and a "we really don't care that much..." ??
    Carleton: frightened by the Queen's Bands since 2014.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenGuy View Post
    That's interesting. Isn't that basically an admission by UOttawa that they are letting someone else decide whether to run their fall sports teams? How can they justify that, other than a big shrug and a "we really don't care that much..." ??
    If by someone else you mean the RSEQ--yes--they must have a league to play in and the RSEQ will decide if they will. As for football, fall b-ball and hockey the OUA has decided that they will not play. You expect them to play games without opponents?

    Suggesting that they do not care is totally unjustified. They care a lot. They will run their fall sports teams and are not letting someone else decide that.


    The plan as of now is to bring as many students athletes back to the campus in September as will come--no matter how many other students are on campus, or not on campus Those that have a league to play in will play games. Those who do not have a league to play games in will still receive coaching and training.


    How can that possibly be construed as not caring?
    Last edited by ottawafan; 2020-07-09 at 14:06.
    Founded in 1848, the University of Ottawa adopted its official colours Garnet and Grey, and like many nineteenth-century institutions, the athletics teams were known only by the school's colours. Eventually, a connection was made between the shorthand "GGs" and "Gee-Gee", the common British nickname for a racehorse. The unique Gee-Gees name and iconic logo known today is a result of 170 years of history in Ottawa

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    Come on over and stay a while!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ottawafan View Post
    If by someone else you mean the RSEQ--yes--they must have a league to play in and the RSEQ will decide if they will. As for football, fall b-ball and hockey the OUA has decided that they will not play. You expect them to play games without opponents?

    How can that possibly be construed as not caring?
    I agree its not justified to say they don't care - I take that back!

    However, it does suggest that they think it is safe to run sports teams in the fall - otherwise they would not consider running the RSEQ teams. Which is interesting, since it implies that they think the OUA is wrong to shut down their sports teams. (unless they have an idea that Toronto is less safe than Montreal, or something like that...)

    I just don't think you can say that it is too big a risk to run teams in the OUA but an OK risk to run teams in the RSEQ.

    Their position must be that it is OK as far as they are concerned to run teams in the fall - but unfortunately for football, etc. they don't have a league to play in.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenGuy View Post
    I agree its not justified to say they don't care - I take that back!

    However, it does suggest that they think it is safe to run sports teams in the fall - otherwise they would not consider running the RSEQ teams. Which is interesting, since it implies that they think the OUA is wrong to shut down their sports teams. (unless they have an idea that Toronto is less safe than Montreal, or something like that...)

    I just don't think you can say that it is too big a risk to run teams in the OUA but an OK risk to run teams in the RSEQ.

    Their position must be that it is OK as far as they are concerned to run teams in the fall - but unfortunately for football, etc. they don't have a league to play in.
    One correction--uOttawa has not decided that is a big risk to run teams in the OUA. There is no OUA fall season to play games in, but they will do all they can , if Public Health Allows, to bring those athletes to campus for coaching and training.

    I am not sure the OUA decided to pull the season strictly on health risks. They might have decided to play games with no attendence allowed as Quebec may do. I think that many schools told the OUA that funding was also a problem. No fundraisers, no gate receipts, no advertising sold, no student sports and rec fees being charged. Add together possible health risks in Sept. plus a drop in funding and they decided to call it a day, as they did in the CW and AUS. My opinion.

    uOttawa has taken a funding hit as well, but as of now( things can change) their RSEQ teams will play if the RSEQ plays. Their OUA athletes will be invited to campus for coaching and training. It makes me think that their Varsity sports programs are financially stronger than they usually let on.

    uOttawa has not said that there will not be any students on campus in September. They have been slowly bringing back graduate students doing research the last couple of weeks. Undergrads are being told they will have the option of taking all of their courses online, but can attend many in person. (must take lab courses in person).

    Note: in June uOttawa's online course structure won two out of the three 2020 prizes awarded by the Canadian Network for Innovation in Education.

    https://www.uottawa.ca/gazette/en/ne...se-initiatives
    Last edited by ottawafan; 2020-07-09 at 16:13.
    Founded in 1848, the University of Ottawa adopted its official colours Garnet and Grey, and like many nineteenth-century institutions, the athletics teams were known only by the school's colours. Eventually, a connection was made between the shorthand "GGs" and "Gee-Gee", the common British nickname for a racehorse. The unique Gee-Gees name and iconic logo known today is a result of 170 years of history in Ottawa

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    Quote Originally Posted by gilligan View Post
    I'm talking about USports. Apparently they've decided that those who age out of football this year do not get to play next year.
    There is an online petition protesting this decision.2485 signers so far.

    https://www.thepetitionsite.com/353/...0881&cid=fb_na
    Founded in 1848, the University of Ottawa adopted its official colours Garnet and Grey, and like many nineteenth-century institutions, the athletics teams were known only by the school's colours. Eventually, a connection was made between the shorthand "GGs" and "Gee-Gee", the common British nickname for a racehorse. The unique Gee-Gees name and iconic logo known today is a result of 170 years of history in Ottawa

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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenGuy View Post
    However, it does suggest that they think it is safe to run sports teams in the fall - otherwise they would not consider running the RSEQ teams. Which is interesting, since it implies that they think the OUA is wrong to shut down their sports teams. (unless they have an idea that Toronto is less safe than Montreal, or something like that...)

    Their position must be that it is OK as far as they are concerned to run teams in the fall - but unfortunately for football, etc. they don't have a league to play in.
    Of course it is. It's safe to run sports teams this Summer, even more in the Fall with the number of remaining active cases steadily going down! Baseball, soccer and other Summer team sports are being played across Québec as we speak (well maybe not this morning but later today for sure!) so where's the problem? Not just kids and teens but adults too. I've been playing softball for a couple of weeks now, my son baseball and my daughter soccer.

    Of course the OUA is wrong to shut down their sports teams. Not to mention Canwest and the AUS.
    Rouge et Or all the way!

    "A school without football is in danger of deteriorating into a medieval study hall" - Vince Lombardi

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    The Fall sports cancellation seems like collateral damage to the fact that many campuses are not taking students in person for the 1st term and doing all courses online. If you bar the students from coming on campus that would have to include student-athletes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sylven View Post
    Of course it is. It's safe to run sports teams this Summer, even more in the Fall with the number of remaining active cases steadily going down! Baseball, soccer and other Summer team sports are being played across Québec as we speak (well maybe not this morning but later today for sure!) so where's the problem? Not just kids and teens but adults too. I've been playing softball for a couple of weeks now, my son baseball and my daughter soccer.

    Of course the OUA is wrong to shut down their sports teams. Not to mention Canwest and the AUS.
    In most provinces, playing football right now would involve ignoring public health guidelines. There are ways to practice, but not play league games.

    Outside of Quebec, the number of cases is no longer going down in Canada. It has pretty much levelled off at roughly the same level of daily cases since mid June, with pockets flaring up here and there. Quebec had a lot of room to go down since they were the most infected per capita, but they could level off as they get closer to the national average.

    If we loosen restrictions, the obvious consequence is that the number of cases will start rising again. Even so, it is likely that some restrictions will be lifted because of our relative success. What our medical officers will be watching is just how much our cases rise. There is a lot of hospital capacity at the moment, so a bit of a rise in exchange for more freedom could be okay, but with how fast this thing spreads it is a pretty fine line between manageable increases and a full blown second wave.

    I know that in Alberta the philosophy has been that they don't want to change any restrictions unless the plan is to make it a long term change. That is why the kids weren't briefly pulled out of school for a few weeks; they were taken out for the full term. It is also why when they lift restrictions, they will only lift those that they're confident can stay lifted for the long term, rather than being like some jurisdictions who lift restrictions and then quickly snap them back in place again. So far this cautious approach has worked. All of the western provinces have done something along these lines.

    Given that the West's overall approach has been much more successful than Quebec's approach, I don't expect that public health officers would suddenly green light Canada West league play. You say it is stupid for our universities to cancel sport. I think it'd be really foolish for them to disregard public health recommendations to play (and would probably void their insurance). Nobody wants the liability of being on a board of directors that disregards public heath recommendations.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gilligan View Post
    You say it is stupid for our universities to cancel sport. I think it'd be really foolish for them to disregard public health recommendations to play (and would probably void their insurance). Nobody wants the liability of being on a board of directors that disregards public heath recommendations.
    I didn't say they were stupid, just wrong. I don't know about the public health recommendations across Canada but in Québec, they're very clear: you can play team sports, both outside and inside. Kids, teens and even adults have been playing team sports for a couple of weeks now and there hasn't been any flare up not even a slight increase in the number of new cases.

    There's also been mass protests with thousands of people in the streets a few weeks ago and there hasn't been any flare up not even a slight increase. The Québec government finally cleared up the terrible mess in the long-term care centres and nursing homes and we saw positive results quickly.

    Even if there was a slight increase in new cases, as long we keep protecting the most vulnerable (seniors aged over 70 and people with serious medical conditions), there's now plenty of room in hospitals as the curve has been flattened big time. We cannot eradicate covid-19 and a vaccine is nowhere near so we have to learn to live with it.

    Talking about that, did you see that article on CBC News and other media yesterday about "Some public health and infectious disease experts are pressing for governments in Canada to shift to minimizing, not eradicating, COVID-19 while allowing society to resume functioning." You can find their open letter and statement here. As you can see, public health recommendations don't point all in the same direction and more and more voices are raising the alarm that we have to stop this lock down foolishness and resume a more or less normal life.
    Rouge et Or all the way!

    "A school without football is in danger of deteriorating into a medieval study hall" - Vince Lombardi

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    For all those who figure that schools and universities won't cause spread and need to open, the idea that young people don't spread it has been pretty debunked thanks to summer camps:

    https://thehill.com/homenews/state-w...7yUM0xccaDl4D4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sylven View Post
    I didn't say they were stupid, just wrong. I don't know about the public health recommendations across Canada but in Québec, they're very clear: you can play team sports, both outside and inside. Kids, teens and even adults have been playing team sports for a couple of weeks now and there hasn't been any flare up not even a slight increase in the number of new cases.

    There's also been mass protests with thousands of people in the streets a few weeks ago and there hasn't been any flare up not even a slight increase. The Québec government finally cleared up the terrible mess in the long-term care centres and nursing homes and we saw positive results quickly.

    Even if there was a slight increase in new cases, as long we keep protecting the most vulnerable (seniors aged over 70 and people with serious medical conditions), there's now plenty of room in hospitals as the curve has been flattened big time. We cannot eradicate covid-19 and a vaccine is nowhere near so we have to learn to live with it.

    Talking about that, did you see that article on CBC News and other media yesterday about "Some public health and infectious disease experts are pressing for governments in Canada to shift to minimizing, not eradicating, COVID-19 while allowing society to resume functioning." You can find their open letter and statement here. As you can see, public health recommendations don't point all in the same direction and more and more voices are raising the alarm that we have to stop this lock down foolishness and resume a more or less normal life.
    There are essentially three ideas out there on how to handle the virus. One is to keep infection levels low enough that ICUs don't get overwhelmed, protect the most vulnerable, and ride this out until a vaccine is available (which could be a long time away), or until we get herd immunity (which would be years and many deaths away). Either way, the goal is the flatten the curve rather than let it burn through everyone at once.

    Another option is that now that we've gotten the infection rate low, we could go a step further and do like New Zealand did and eradicate the virus. This is especially tempting in provinces where it is almost wiped out already. The final option would be to go the way of USA, Brazil, or Sweden and have almost no restrictions in place.

    All of these solutions have major problems. New Zealand had the benefit of getting down to zero cases for a while, but since travel is not 100% eliminated and the virus exists elsewhere, cases get brought in and flare up again. With strong contact tracing and a lot of effort, they may be able to get back to zero again, but it'll be a constant battle as long as the virus exists elsewhere. They may never get a chance to let up, which takes away some of the benefits of eradicating the virus. Applying the New Zealand model in Canada would be really difficult, as we're not as isolated and share a land border with the most infected nation in the world.

    Canada is doing the flatten the curve route. We're not trying to eliminate the virus, but rather live with it. When this first started, we looked at China in horror and wanted to prevent the same outcome here. What has gone largely unnoticed is that even though we are doing relatively well and have flattened the curve, we had more infections than China and almost 2x as many deaths, despite China having 37x more population than us. Our relative success is only a success when you compare it to the worst countries like the USA and Brazil. A lot of countries have handled this far better than we have, yet some of us are ready to hang a mission accomplished banner.

    The final option of doing almost nothing has the well documented problem of a high death rate, where people who should've survived the pandemic end up dying needlessly.

    The main problem with the decision making is that governments sometimes make decisions for economic reasons rather than medical ones. They're willing to let infections rise in an attempt to open up more of the economy. The problem is there isn't evidence that the economy has benefited from such moves. Sweden had a much higher infection and death rate than their neighbours, but the exact same economic decline. They killed people for an economic gain that never materialised. What the data is telling us so far is that most of the damage to the economy is caused by the virus existing, independent of any lock-down measures we put in place to fight it. It turns out that politicians ignoring the virus doesn't make the problem go away, because the global economy doesn't have the ability to ignore a pandemic. You can't legislate away the economic damage of a global pandemic, but you can mitigate the health consequences. Given that, I'd prefer that public health decisions were made for medial reasons only.
    Last edited by gilligan; 2020-07-10 at 10:46.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gilligan View Post

    The main problem with the decision making is that governments sometimes make decisions for economic reasons rather than medical ones. They're willing to let infections rise in an attempt to open up more of the economy. The problem is there isn't evidence that the economy has benefited from such moves. Sweden had a much higher infection and death rate than their neighbours, but the exact same economic decline. They killed people for an economic gain that never materialised. What the data is telling us so far is that most of the damage to the economy is caused by the virus existing, independent of any lock-down measures we put in place to fight it. It turns out that politicians ignoring the virus doesn't make the problem go away, because the global economy doesn't have the ability to ignore a pandemic. You can't legislate away the economic damage of a global pandemic, but you can mitigate the health consequences. Given that, I'd prefer that public health decisions were made for medial reasons only.
    One might add that governments sometimes make decisions for political reasons rather than medical ones.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenGuy View Post
    One might add that governments sometimes make decisions for political reasons rather than medical ones.
    Very true. They want to look good and be re-elected. A pandemic response deemed favourable by most people helps with that.

    Even though going slightly more back to normal won't help the economy much and hurts our fight against the virus a little, it can make some people feel a lot better. As long as it doesn't have catastrophic consequences, it can be a politically smart move for them to keep reopening.

    Politics will be a big part of the border re-opening too. One one hand, we have our largest trading partner putting political pressure on us, which could normally make it tough for our doctors ask that it stays closed. However, with about 88% of the Canadian population being against opening the border, the government has a lot of motivation to side with what the medical community will want.

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